Students from St Philip's Cessnock and Kurri Kurri Public School receive Fred Hollows Humanity Award

Five Cessnock-area students are among 420 nationwide to be recognised for their compassion, integrity and kindness in the 2017 Fred Hollows Humanity Awards.

St Philip’s Christian College trio Imogen Langham, Layla-Rose Schillert and Lehanru Lotter, and Kurri Kurri Public School students Hayley Mossman and Charlotte Childs were among 176 recipients in NSW for this year’s awards.

A national initiative of the Fred Hollows Foundation, the award acknowledges Year 6 students who follow the late Professor Hollows’s footsteps by demonstrating humanitarian values towards others.

Professor Hollows, who died in 1993, dedicated his life to helping others, saving the sight of disadvantaged people around the world.

Imogen, Layla and Lehanru have raised money through bake sales, Lenten promises, community events for the Sydney Children’s Hospital, their fellow students facing difficult times and the community of Cessnock. 

St Philip’s Cessnock head of middle school, Scott Logan said these students are loving, kind, friendly role models within their year and school.

Imogen Langham, Layla-Rose Schillert and Lehanru Lotter from St Philip's Christian College Cessnock.

Imogen Langham, Layla-Rose Schillert and Lehanru Lotter from St Philip's Christian College Cessnock.

“These students are a picture of love, care and humanity,” he said.

“We are all so incredibly proud of these three students and know this love and compassion is widespread across the whole school.

“Some would say they are the hornet’s nest of friendship and kindness.”

Hayley and Charlotte are both members of the Kurri Kurri Public School leadership team and many representative sports teams, and help to run the Kinder Buddies program.

Both girls also work with Rotary outside of school.

Kurri Kurri Public School community liaison officer Davina Dawes said the school is enormously proud of Hayley and Charlotte’s achievements, praising the pair for putting their responsibility to the community above their own interests.

The awards were presented by Professor Hollows’s widow Gabi and NSW Education Minister Rob Stokes at Parliament House, Sydney on October 23.

“The endless ideas and energy of young people continues to inspire me and it was great to meet some of the students who are making a positive difference in their communities,” Mrs Hollows said.

Hayley Mossman and Charlotte Childs, from Kurri Kurri Public School.

Hayley Mossman and Charlotte Childs, from Kurri Kurri Public School.

“Fred would have been incredibly proud of the contribution these students are making to society and of the foundation for recognising and encouraging them to help others, no matter how big or small their actions.”

The Fred Hollows Humanity Award will in 2018. Visit hollows.org/humanityaward for more information.

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