Cessnock West Public School opens community garden

GREEN THUMBS: Cessnock West Public School stage two students and principal Ruth McGlashan at the newly-opened community garden. Picture: Krystal Sellars
GREEN THUMBS: Cessnock West Public School stage two students and principal Ruth McGlashan at the newly-opened community garden. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock West Public School has officially opened its community garden on Campbell Street.

The garden boasts more than 30 types of fruit, vegetables and herbs, and is open to the public.

It was designed and created by the school’s stage two classes as part of their project-based learning activities, which are driven by the students.

After deciding upon a garden that would be shared with the whole community, the students researched plants that would grow well in the local conditions; how much sunlight and water each plant would need, and how much it would cost to maintain.

They enlisted the help of Cessnock Men’s Shed and Cessnock Lions Club to construct the four garden beds, which were built on a vacant patch of grass outside the school fence.

HELP YOURSELF: Cessnock West Public School's community garden is open to the public on Campbell Street.

HELP YOURSELF: Cessnock West Public School's community garden is open to the public on Campbell Street.

The students raised money for the project by holding a 50-cent sale and a crazy hair day, and through the sales of their recipe book, which features ingredients from the garden.

Art and marketing was also part of the project – the students designed invitations and did a letterbox drop in the nearby streets.

The opening ceremony was held on Wednesday, when students gave a presentation about to explain the process of the garden project to their invited guests, before principal Ruth McGlashan cut the ribbon to declare the garden officially open.

Mrs McGlashan said the garden was a fantastic project.

“I’m very impressed with the hard work, organisation and fundraising that has gone into it, and I’m sure the community will appreciate it once it starts to grow,” she said.

“Hopefully it will be part of our school for many years.”