Cessnock City Council takes aim at service barriers in submission to NSW government Special Commission of Inquiry into the Drug Ice

... there are limited treatment options available and a number of barriers to accessing existing services.

Bob Pynsent, Cessnock mayor.

Limited treatment options and barriers to existing services in the Lower Hunter will be the foundation of a submission Cessnock City Council plans to make to the NSW government's Special Commission of Inquiry into the Drug Ice.

The commission of inquiry was established last November to consider the prevalence and impact of ice - or crystal methamphetamine - in communities as well as the effectiveness of measures that are in place to target the drug in NSW.

It aims to set out options to strengthen the state's response to the drug, as well as other illicit stimulants, including in the areas of law enforcement, education, treatment and rehabilitation.

Cessnock mayor Bob Pynsent said the Coalfields council had made it a priority to draft a submission for the commission of inquiry, to highlight the issues specific to its area.

"This is a dangerous drug and we know it's tearing apart people's lives," he said.

"In putting this submission together it became clear there are a variety of issues around treatment options for those seeking assistance.

"We've spoken to numerous individuals, families and local community service providers who shared their knowledge and experiences.

"One theme became quite clear, that there are limited treatment options available and a number of barriers to accessing existing services."

Submissions are open until May 7.

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This story Ice treatment options 'limited': Cessnock council submission first appeared on Newcastle Herald.