Noel Bush concerned over 'high-powered rifles' being used to hunt deer in bush at Kurri Kurri

DANGER: Kurri's Noel Bush says high-powered weapons are being used in bushland far too close to Kurri Hospital and houses. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.
DANGER: Kurri's Noel Bush says high-powered weapons are being used in bushland far too close to Kurri Hospital and houses. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.

A Kurri Kurri man has grave concerns someone will be seriously hurt after hearing what he believed to be high-power rifles being used in bush land in his suburb.

Noel Bush said he had heard the loud gunshots from his home and also while out camping in the bush off Mulbring Street near Kurri Kurri Hospital.

"It's pretty close to the road," he said.

"If they misfire, they could be putting a bullet through someone's window.

"It's right near the hospital too.

"I often see people walking on the tracks with their dogs too.

"I'm concerned for people's safety."

Mr Bush, who has hunting experience, said the guns did not sound like ordinary hunting weapons.

"I was out there a few months ago and I heard three bangs," he said. "It wasn't a .22 or an air rifle.

"When you're camping and you hear high powered rifles, it's a bit disconcerting."

Mr Bush said he believed the guns were being used to hunt deer, having found the remains of one a bit more than a week ago, which were still there when The Mercury visited on Thursday.

He said the remains were roughly 150 metres in from the road.

If they misfire, they could be putting a bullet through someone's window.

Noel Bush

"If you miss, it could easily reach the road."

Mr Bush said he understood deer were a problem, and had no problem with people hunting them, but did not believe such powerful weapons were needed to do so.

"Deer do damage to people's properties," he said.

"I'm accepting of gun laws. You've got to wait your time to get one.

"But people shouldn't be using high-powered rifles in that area.

"They give people who do the right thing [with guns] a bad name."

Mr Bush said he didn't think the people involved would stop using the weapons, so wanted to see more police patrols of the area to prevent it from happening.

"Kurri Kurri is a bit like the wild west," he said.

"I understand police are under-resourced, but it is a real problem."

A spokesperson for NSW Police said the issue had so far not been reported to authorities, and urged people who have concerns about this sort of activity to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Reports can be made anonymously.