Net zero to grow Queensland jobs: report

A report commissioned by the Climate Council says the net zero transition will grow Queensland jobs.
A report commissioned by the Climate Council says the net zero transition will grow Queensland jobs.

Queensland workers should not fear job losses from the transition to net zero, says a report which claims the switch will boost the state's economy.

A Deloitte Access Economics report commissioned by the Climate Council says every region of the state will benefit on the way to net zero.

The report says that by 2050, the Queensland economy could grow to a $780 billion economy with a 3.6 million-strong workforce.

It forecasts "clean economy" jobs will grow by 2.5 per cent annually until 2030, making up three quarters of the fastest-growing occupations.

"If we plan early for the economic transformation, all Queensland regions and workers will enjoy clean economic growth and job opportunities," the Climate Council's Nicki Hutley said.

The report said fears workers in emissions-intensive industries would not be in demand during the transition were unfounded.

Affected workers would have career options to "immediately pursue" while people like electricians could do the same job in a new "clean" industry.

"The fear that decarbonisation will result in large and permanent job losses is not borne out by this research," the report said.

"Queenslanders whose jobs are disrupted can do on-the-job training to be ready for the new industries of a net zero economy.

"Workers have, on average, four alternative career pathways that they can immediately pursue using their current skill set."

However, the report warned that if the net zero transition wasn't handled correctly, workers would pay the price along with the economy as climate change intensifies.

It said a botched transition could lead to global warming exceeding three degrees by 2070, reducing Queensland's average economic growth to 2050 to just over two per cent.

In the past 30 years, Queensland's economy has grown at an average of 3.8 per cent.

Australian Associated Press