Upgrades at Hermitage Road and Broke Road underway

PROGRESS: Singleton Council general manager Jason Linnane, Cessnock Mayor Bob Pynsent, Cessnock City Council general manager Stephen Glen and Singleton 
Mayor John Martin inspecting works on Broke Road, Pokolbin.
PROGRESS: Singleton Council general manager Jason Linnane, Cessnock Mayor Bob Pynsent, Cessnock City Council general manager Stephen Glen and Singleton Mayor John Martin inspecting works on Broke Road, Pokolbin.

Construction of the Hermitage and Broke Road upgrade at Pokolbin is well underway.

The project received $16.7 million in funding under the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Resources for Regions program, which aims to support regional and rural NSW communities affected by mining by addressing infrastructure constraints.

It will be jointly delivered by Cessnock City Council and Singleton Council and will include a an upgrade of the full length of Hermitage Road and the intersection with Broke Road, on-road cycle ways, installation of tourist facilities, lighting, safety measures and more signage.

Current works involve the reconstruction of the western end of Broke Road, extending to and including the upgrade of its intersection with Hermitage Road.

Cessnock City Council’s design delivery manager Katrina Kerr said the intersection upgrade will improve road user safety and visibility, allowing for protected right turns into Hermitage Road.

This current stage of works involves widening the road with a new pavement, as well as construction of the new cycleway.

Council’s economic development manager Jane Holdsworth said the introduction of a cycleway will provide positive new offerings for visitors to the region.

“Over recent years, Australia has seen a significant growth in bicycle ownership and use, with many people becoming increasingly aware of the convenience, enjoyment and widespread health and environmental benefits of cycling,” Ms Holdsworth said.

Member for Upper Hunter Michael Johnsen said he was impressed with the progress of the first stage of the project.

“These cycle ways, which have been funded by the Resources for Region program, are an important link for our tourism industry,” Mr Johnsen said.

“This work forms part of the Cessnock and Singleton Council’s masterplan for the further development of Australia’s premier wine region.”

The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2016.

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